Upland Fields

Approximately 3.8 non-continuous acres

Summary Assessment
Upland fields at the Lynn Farm consist of well-established native warm season grasses with intermingled exotic cool season pasture grasses and occasional native and exotic wildflowers. Problem weeds, which are patchy in occurrence, include the exotic annuals Japanese Stiltgrass (Microstegium viminium) and Small Basketgrass (Arthraxon hispidus), exotic perennial Beefsteak Plant (Perilla frutescens) and Bermuda Grass (Cynodon dactylon), a small patch of the exotic Vinca vine, and the native perennial Canada Goldenrod (Solidago canadensis).
Aerial photography indicates that upland fields, which slope gently toward Accokeek Creek, have been open since at least 1969. The relative absence of woody growth suggest the fields have been mown at least yearly within the recent past. Aerial photography from 1937 indicates upland fields were once in evergreen growth, possibly as planted pine stands. Comparisons of pre- and post-logging aerial photography suggests that woody debris from the recent logging was deposited in a large portion of the Western Field and a smaller portion of the Central Field.

Central Field, June 2016. Upland fields at the Lynn Farm are grass dominated with occasional wildflowers and tree saplings. Scattered trees occur near the edges. Much of the power line spans the upland fields.
Central Field, June 2016. Upland fields at the Lynn Farm are grass dominated with occasional wildflowers and tree saplings. Scattered trees occur near the edges. Much of the power line spans the upland fields.

Restoration & Management Implications
•Various strategies can be used to target woody growth, problem weeds, and exotic cool season grasses and thereby preserve native grassland habitat provided by upland fields. Strategies can include strategically timed mowing, selective herbicide applications, and prescribed grazing.
•Existing upland fields and adjacent clear cut areas can be simultaneously managed for grassland habitat even though recent management history of these two areas differs.
•Removing and stockpiling the large woody debris deposits will favor grassland habitat. Depending on emergent growth, these areas may require seeding.
•Pasturing horses in upland fields should be avoided as native warm season bunch grasses do not rebound from grazing as do exotic cool season pasture grasses, particularly if grazed during summer, their most active growth period.